about SOTN

The mission of Special Olympics is to provide year-round sports training and athletic competition in a variety of Olympic-type sports for children and adults with intellectual disabilities, giving them continuing opportunities to develop physical fitness, demonstrate courage, experience joy and participate in a sharing of gifts, skills and friendship with their families, other Special Olympics athletes and the community.

Special Olympics Tennessee

Participants

Special Olympics Tennessee is divided into 33 volunteer area offices. Athletes may begin training as early as six years old, but must be eight years old to compete.

Competition
Special Olympics Tennessee is a year-round movement, holding more than 100 competitions annually on area, regional and state levels. Event divisions are based on age, gender and ability level to give athletes an equal chance to win. Each participant receives a medal or ribbon following their events.

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sports offered

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area programs

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registered athletes

Special Olympics Tennessee has six statewide events annually: Summer Games, Golf, Flag Football, Fall Classic, Winter Games and Basketball. Special Olympics, Inc. holds World Games every other year and USA National Games every four years.

Current Sports

  • Alpine skiing
  • Aquatics
  • Athletics (Track and Field)
  • Basketball
  • Bocce
  • Bowling
  • Equestrian
  • Flag Football
  • Golf
  • Horseshoes
  • Powerlifiting
  • Roller Skating
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Snowboarding
  • Speed Skating
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball

Volunteers

Volunteers are the lifeline of the Special Olympics program. Volunteers serve as coaches, officials, committee members, competition assistants, speech coaches and much more. There are more than 3,500 volunteer coaches involved in the program.

Funding

Special Olympics Tennessee is a registered 501(c)(3), non-profit organization supported by private donations from individuals, corporations and organizations throughout the state. Special Olympics is “the most credible charity in America” according to a survey in the Chronicle of Philanthropy.